This ancient shark with a snake head and 300 teeth is why we should just say nope to the ocean

Maybe it’s time we Homo sapiens reevaluated our relationship with the oceans of the world.

It has been a good few millennia, sure, but our love affair may have been a little rushed. After all, what do we really know about the ocean? Roughly 95 percent of it remains unexplored, and it seems as if every other day we’re finding out something new and unsettling.

Old emotions can die hard. So for the unconvinced holdouts, here’s a little push:

That sea-dwelling, serpentine conglomeration of nightmare fuel is the frilled shark, one of the oldest — and in the running for the creepiest — living species on the planet.

Its prehistoric contemporaries, such as Tyrannosaurus rex and triceratops, died out long ago, but the frilled shark is still swimming around deep below the surface of the world’s oceans, scientists say.

They know that because of an accident that sounds vaguely like the plot of a straight-to-video horror movie. A group of European Union scientists were trawling the depths of the Atlantic Ocean this month, trying to figure out a way to “minimize unwanted catches in commercial fishing,” according to the BBC.

Instead, they ended up capturing one of the rarest and most ancient creatures on the planet, one that may have inspired 19th-century tales of “sea serpents.”

What those sailors didn’t know was that the frilled shark has looked pretty much the same since the breakup of Pangea. Mainly, that look is horrifying.

The largest can grow six feet long — the size of a tall man. The shark is named after its gills, which have frilly, fluffy edges, but the cuddly factor ends abruptly there.

Inside its short-snouted head are 300 more…

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