Better Living Through Music, Art and Polyamory

Books and prints from the early 20th century introduce the George Circle (although it doesn’t go much beyond an introduction). Nearby is a monitor showing Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s “Satan’s Brew” (1976), a film about a contemporary poet who thinks he is Stefan George and who recruits male prostitutes from the Munich train station to perform George Circle rituals and readings.

Photo

Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s promotional still for “Satan’s Brew” (1976).

Credit
Galerie Buchholz

The show quickly moves into mid-20th-century psychedelic territory, with works by the artists Ludwig Gosewitz and Jordan Belson that use drawing and painting to realign perception. One of the highlights of this section is “Aprés Hello Dalí” (1965), a painting with swirling motifs by Isaac Abrams, who operated Coda, a 1960s gallery in downtown Manhattan devoted to psychedelic art.

Music as an inspiration for harmonious — or at least alternative modes of — living is suggested by photographs of Jahnn and his organ designs, and circular musical notation by the theorist Hans Kayser, who looked for eternal laws in mathematics, as well as music. Album covers and ephemera relating to the influential composer Karlheinz Stockhausen (who, before his death in 2007, ended his career making operas to express his spiritual vision of the cosmos) and the psychedelic cartoonist and designer Emil Schult (who also worked with the electronic band Kraftwerk) extend these ideas into the technological realm. Mr. Schult, for instance, crafted lyrics for Kraftwerk’s 1978 album “The Man-Machine.”

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John McCracken’d “Untitled” (1971), the spiritual side of minimalism.

Credit
Galerie Buchholz

The exhibition then shifts to the Americas, with delirious album covers, designs and…

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